There was a problem. As one might imagine, the decaying carcass of an 8-ton sea creature posed a serious health hazard to beachgoers. The park is the latest example of what the public can come up with when invited to choose the name for sites or vessels. But "Exploding Whale Memorial Park" won in a landslide, with 439 votes of the 856 submitted, according to the statement. Continue Reading Show full articles without "Continue Reading" button for {0} hours. As it turns out, it’s being called as “Exploding Whale Memorial Park.” I was curious if you’d been out there or not. Jo Beaudreau, the owner of an art supply store and the designer of the park’s sign, said the explosion is “still a little bit of a touchy subject” for residents, especially those who were involved in the blast. The naming of the park in Oregon, however, is not an internet-fueled fluke: Ms. Messmer said most residents are excited about the park’s name. Most of the names on the list spoke to the site's natural beauty: "Rolling Tides Community Park," "Dune View Park" and "Little Tree Park" were several of the less gruesome options. A sign bearing the park’s new name was installed on June 13, with a rendering of a whale spouting water in the shape of a heart. Learn more at a free Oregon Historical Society talk with the KATU reporter who was on the scene of the fated blubbery blast. A widely reported case of an exploding whale occurred in Florence, Oregon, in November 1970, when the Oregon Highway Division blew up a decaying sperm whale with dynamite in an attempt to dispose of its rotting carcass. The residents have recently chosen to name a local recreational area “Exploding Whale Memorial Park.” On November 9, 1970, a 45-foot long, 8-ton whale, described variously as a gray or sperm whale, washed ashore at Florence on the central Oregon Coast. Another whale explosion occurred on January 29, 2004, in Tainan City, Taiwan. Fast-forward to last Saturday, when a dedication ceremony christened Florence’s new Exploding Whale Memorial Park, a grassy good-time getaway along the Siuslaw River. For a limited time, you can take out a digital subscription to any of our best-selling science magazines for just $2.38 per month, or 45% off the standard price for the first three months.View Deal. November would have marked the 50th anniversary of the whale's big bang, and the town, on the southern Oregon coast, planned to announce the park's new name in May at the 113th annual Florence Rhododendron Festival, which had a special theme this year: "Blast from the Past.". (Image: © Courtesy of the City of Florence). According to LiveScience, Exploding Whale Memorial Park in Florence, Oregon, is named for an explosive event that took place Nov. 12, 1970, when … "Exploding Whale Memorial Park" in Florence, Oregon, is named for the explosive event of Nov. 12, 1970, when local officials blew up a beached and decomposing sperm whale … “I can still conjure it up 40 years later,” Linnman said in 2010. Exploding Whale Memorial Park. The park has a shelter with picnic tables, as well as an open grassy area. In a poll to determine the new park’s name, “Exploding Whale Memorial Park” garnered 439 out of 856 votes. One particularly hefty slab landed on an unoccupied parked car about a quarter-mile (0.4 kilometers) from the blast site, crushing the roof. The whale recently made headlines again when an English municipality took to Twitter to relate the COVID-19 pandemic to lessons learned from the exploding whale. Named by residents to memorialize the notorious "exploding whale" incident that took place on the Oregon Coast in the 70s, this beautiful wayside park offers sandy beach and views of the Siuslaw River Bridge. Nov. 12, 1970 is an auspicious day in Oregon history. The explosion threw whale flesh over 80 Residents of a coastal Oregon city voted to name a park for a 1970 explosion that rained chunks of rotting whale flesh on curious bystanders. Florence has a new park and it’s named after one of Oregon’s greatest triumphs -- welcome to Exploding Whale Memorial Park. Now, the residents of Florence, Oregon, have decided to commemorate the event by christening their new local park "Exploding Whale Memorial Park". The park … What was this incident? NY 10036. Oregon's 'Exploding Whale' legend turns 50 50 years ago, we blew up a whale and it either went terribly, or very well depending on your perspective. A newly-named Oregon park commemorates an important (and gory) piece of local history: the dynamiting of a dead whale that took place 50 years ago. There have been several cases of whale carcasses bursting due to a buildup of gas in the decomposition process. The council used the exploding whale analogy to tell people to listen to the experts. The explosion instead spewed large chunks of decayed whale on curious bystanders, and even crushed a nearby parked car. Welcome to Exploding Whale Memorial Park! The rest of the park includes picnic tables, a grassy lawn and views of the Siuslaw River and Bridge, according to the City of Florence website. Other ideas were “Bridge View Park” and “Siuslaw River View Park” for nearby landmarks. Jun 17, 2020. Everyone nearby was drenched with dead whale, Linnman said. But however idyllic the park may be, its name ensures that the memory of that long-dead whale's messy ending will never die. Exploding Whale Memorial Park. Rusty Blazenhoff 5:30 am Thu Jul 2, 2020 . Stay up to date on the coronavirus outbreak by signing up to our newsletter today. New York, Now, a half-century later they have named a park after that lesson. An Oregon town has named a park after a whale that the state blew up 50 years ago. 18 June 2020, "The blast blasted blubber beyond all believable bounds.". Visitors also enjoy grassy areas, picnic shelters, and views of the dunes across the river. Thank you for signing up to Live Science. “It’s not gory,” Ms. Messmer said. That is the name of the new park that opened in Florence, Oregon, this week, the city’s website says. What do you do with the carcass of a 45-foot, 8-ton whale on the beach? The city of Florence recently unveiled the “Exploding Whale Memorial Park” on the north side of the Siuslaw River. The council used the exploding whale analogy to tell people to listen to the experts. In 2016, a British research agency’s call for help naming a ship was answered with “Boaty McBoatface.” The ship was instead named for the naturalist David Attenborough, though a British submarine was given the whimsical name in an effort to appease disappointed internet users. Actual explosives have also been used to assist in disposing of whale carcasses, ordinarily after towing the carcass out to sea. The name was selected by the citizens of the town and the city government says that out of the 124 suggestions, Exploding Whale Memorial Park was the winner, blowing out the competition from other, more traditional names, like ‘Dune View Park’ or ‘Siuslaw River View Park.’ Florence has a new park and it’s named after one of Oregon’s greatest triumphs -- welcome to Exploding Whale Memorial Park. More than half of the final tally — 439 out of 856 responses — voted for “Exploding Whale Memorial Park,” Ms. Messmer said. Live Science is part of Future US Inc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. In June, it was commemorated with the opening of the Exploding Whale Memorial Park. According […] This riverfront park provides access to the Siuslaw River in Historic Old Town Florence. Exploding Whale Memorial Park opens near site where that beached whale was blown up in 1970. The park … City of Florence workers install the sign for Exploding Whale Memorial Park … The park is the latest example of what the public can come up with when invited to choose the name for sites or vessels. Though the … Of 124 names that people in the community initially proposed for the park, nine were picked as finalists, with the winner to be decided in a "Name the Park" survey, City of Florence representatives said in a statement. This time the explosion resulted from the buildup of gas inside a decomposing sperm whale, which caused it to burst. Exploding Whale Memorial Park. Cutting and then burying it wasn’t an option because no one wanted to take on that task. The whale recently made headlines again when an English municipality took to Twitter to relate the COVID-19 pandemic to lessons learned from the exploding whale. https://boingboing.net/2020/07/02/exploding-whale-memorial-park.html Exploding Whale Memorial Park opens near site where that beached whale was blown up in 1970 . Last year, Florence residents voted from among nine options to name a new park on the Siuslaw River as Exploding Whale Memorial Park. “It’s a cute whale.”. OFFER: Save 45% on 'How It Works' 'All About Space' and 'All About History'! Last year, Florence residents voted from among nine options to name a new park on the Siuslaw River as Exploding Whale Memorial Park. The name w Exploding Whale Memorial Park is now open to visitors, with various coronavirus restrictions in place. Florence residents overwhelmingly voted to name this idyllic spot after an exploded whale. Head to Exploding Whale Memorial Park. Exploding Whale Memorial Park is now open to the public. Oregon Park Named After Legendary 'Exploding Whale' Incident. Musician Dan Tanz further described the gruesome scene in 2016, in a haunting banjo tune, "The Exploding Whale Song.". They couldn’t bury it, fearing the eight tons of rotting flesh and its smell would quickly be exposed. (Facebook) A town in Oregon renamed one of its parks after a rotting beached whale carcass town officials exploded 50 years prior. More than half of the final tally — 439 out of 856 responses — voted for “Exploding Whale Memorial Park,” Ms. Messmer said. FLORENCE, Ore. – Welcome to the newest park on the Oregon coast – Exploding Whale Memorial Park! KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on…”Exploding Whale Park.” Exploding Whale Correspondent: "I … Recently named the "Exploding Whale Memorial Park," the new park provides views of the Siuslaw River and Bridge as well as the iconic sand dunes on the South side of the river. The park is located along the Siuslaw River on Rhododendron Drive. And so, this past weekend, the city of Florence officially announced that the previously-dubbed Siuslaw River Beach Access Park would forevermore be known as the Exploding Whale Memorial Park. The story is legendary. Nearly 50 years ago, a whale beached itself on … Exploding Whale Memorial Park. City of Florence/Facebook The infamous sperm whale was already dead when it … Visitors also enjoy grassy areas, picnic shelters, and views of the dunes across the river. Rather than put the escapade behind them, Florence residents voted to dedicate a park after the 1970 blast, choosing “Exploding Whale Memorial Park” as the name for the recreational area in the city, which is about 130 miles southwest of Portland. Other ideas were “Bridge View Park” and “Siuslaw River View Park” for nearby landmarks. The city of Florence, Oregon, has opened a new municipal park named Exploding Whale Memorial Park. According to LiveScience, Exploding Whale Memorial Park in Florence, Oregon, is named for an explosive event that took place Nov. 12, 1970, when … The coastal city of Florence has announced a name for its newest park, which references a literal blast from the past. Spectators fled in all directions, escaping the awful smell and the rain of rotting whale flesh. The name was chosen after city officials asked the public for … 4. "It covered the diner and laundromat, with bits of blood and bone; It covered the old Ben Franklin with a wash of rancid foam," Tanz sang. She hopes the park can serve as a reminder that “we should celebrate our mistakes” and not be embarrassed. In 1970, a deceased 45 foot, eight ton whale washed ashore near Florence. Almost 50 years ago, the Oregon Highway Division (now the Oregon DOT) blew up a dead sperm whale after it washed ashore. A beauty spot in Oregon has been named 'Exploding Whale Memorial Park' after the infamous exploding whale incident of 1970, nearly 50 years ago. But when engineers set off the half-ton of explosives, "the blast blasted blubber beyond all believable bounds," Paul Linnman, a reporter who filmed the explosion for Portland news station KATU, said at the time. The event has been local lore for years so this year, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the event, the city named a park “Exploding Whale Memorial Park.” You can see the news report on You Tube by looking for “exploding whale Oregon.” -0-Here’s a joke a high school buddy sent me: The infamous exploding whale story from KATU News, circa 1970. ‘Exploding Whale’ Park Memorializes Blubber Blast 50 Years Later. Park amenities include a shelter with picnic tables and a nice grassy area to enjoy a picnic on a sunny day. In a poll to determine the new park’s name, “Exploding Whale Memorial Park” garnered 439 out of 856 votes. The park … The mascot for Exploding Whale Memorial Park is shown in Florence, Ore., in June 2020. In 1970, the dead, decaying sperm whale that washed up near Florence posed a serious health hazard. “Exploding Whale Memorial Park” in Florence opened this week in honor of the 8-ton behemoth that was blasted to smithereens after state officials … Named by residents to memorialize the notorious "exploding whale" incident that took place on the Oregon Coast in the 70s, this beautiful wayside park offers sandy beach and views of the Siuslaw River Bridge. The community also created a mascot for the exploding whale's 50th anniversary: an adorable, totally intact whale named Flo. Head to Exploding Whale Memorial Park. Future US, Inc. 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, Nov. 12, 1970 is an auspicious day in Oregon history. This year’s theme was supposed to be “Blast From the Past.”. The name was chosen after city officials asked the public for suggestions. As it turns out, it’s being called as “Exploding Whale Memorial Park.” I was curious if you’d been out there or not. Mindy Weisberger - Senior Writer Fast-forward to last Saturday, when a dedication ceremony christened Florence’s new Exploding Whale Memorial Park, a grassy good-time getaway along the Siuslaw River. And while guidelines and perspectives have certainly changed over the years, Linnman remembers that day as if it were yesterday. By Now, a half-century later they have named a park after that lesson. The Exploding Whale Memorial Park was funded by two grants: The Land Water Conservation Fund awarded $43,762 and Oregon State Park’s Local Government Grant Program gave $87,525. A local resident dressed up as “Flo the Whale” to highlight the new name of the park in Florence, Ore. It was too big to drag away or bury, and officials decided to get rid of the stinking corpse with dynamite,  blasting it into manageable, bite-size chunks that scavenging birds and crabs would then clean up, according to the Oregon Historical Society (OHS). See Wacky Oregon Coast History: Nov. 12 is Happy Exploding Whale Day, New Facts The decade anniversaries have been fervently noted and celebrated, starting with the twentieth back in 1990. The park has a shelter with picnic tables, as well as an open grassy area. Please refresh the page and try again. The episode also found renewed relevance recently as a town in northern England used the blubber-coated bystanders in Oregon as a lesson to its residents about the coronavirus: “Sometimes, it’s better to just sit at home and do nothing than go outside and do something ridiculous,” it said on Twitter. The Oregon Department of Transportation used 20 cases of dynamite to blow it up. In fact, the event became the city’s claim to fame, and Florence in June christened a riverfront park “Exploding Whale Memorial Park” to mark the 50th anniversary. Visit our corporate site. More than half of the final tally — 439 out of 856 responses — voted for “Exploding Whale Memorial Park,” Ms. Messmer said. So, state highway officials decided to use a half-ton of dynamite to blow up the 45-foot sperm whale, hoping its disintegrated matter would be whisked away by sea gulls. Current policy in the state of Oregon dictates that beached, dead whales must be buried and not blown up, according to the OHS. Though the … The residents have recently chosen to name a local recreational area “Exploding Whale Memorial Park.” On November 9, 1970, a 45-foot long, 8-ton whale, described variously as a gray or sperm whale, washed ashore at Florence on the central Oregon Coast. (Image credit: Courtesy of the City of Florence), Mysterious black spot in polar explorer's diary offers gruesome clue to his fate, Black holes may not exist, but fuzzballs might, wild theory suggests, These photos of the Arecibo Observatory telescope collapse are just heartbreaking, Biblical Goliath may not have been a giant, Chinese submarine reaches the deepest place on Earth, Mystery Settlers Reached 'Step to Americas' Before Vikings, Scientists just mapped 1 million new galaxies, in 300 hours. The city planned to unveil the name at its annual Rhody Days celebration – with this year’s theme of Blast from the Past – but the coronavirus closures “blew those plans out of the water.” The new park is … Exploding Whale Memorial Park is nestled on the banks of the Siuslaw River, and has a nice walking path and put-in access for canoes and kayaks. The 1970 blast was a lesson learned for Oregon: There is now a policy to bury carcasses that can’t be removed easily, Ms. Messmer said. In 2018, a community of 5,000 in Estonia received 12,000 votes online to make a cannabis leaf the symbol on its flag. “I can still conjure it up 40 years later,” Linnman said in 2010. Exploding Whale Memorial Park, in Florence, Oregon. Exploding Whale Memorial Park is now open to the public. And while guidelines and perspectives have certainly changed over the years, Linnman remembers that day as if it were yesterday. The infamous exploding whale story from KATU News, circa 1970. After the park opened last May with a temporary name, the city asked residents for suggestions for a permanent title, later narrowing those to a few in an online survey. In 2020, residents of Florence voted to name a new recreational area "Exploding Whale Memorial Park" in honor of the incident. In June, it was commemorated with the opening of the Exploding Whale Memorial Park. A newly-named Oregon park commemorates an important (and gory) piece of local history: the dynamiting of a dead whale that took place 50 years ago. Fifty years ago, a whale carcass washed ashore near Florence, Ore., and the authorities wrestled with how to get rid of it. The blast is a point of contention for some residents, Ms. Messmer said, as the city is often blamed for the decision to blow up the carcass; the state highway division was responsible. The name was selected by the citizens of the town and the city government says that out of the 124 suggestions, Exploding Whale Memorial Park was the winner, blowing out the competition from other, more traditional names, like ‘Dune View Park’ or ‘Siuslaw River View Park.’ Next to the park's new sign is "Flo the Whale," a mascot that a local community member created in anticipation of the 50th anniversary of the exploding whale event. Exploding Whale Memorial Park, Florence, Oregon. The community also created a mascot for the exploding whale's 50th anniversary: an adorable, totally intact whale named Flo. Today, the Exploded Whale Memorial Park's iconic sand dunes are a peaceful and gore-free sight. That is the name of the new park that opened in Florence, Oregon, this week, the city’s website says. Named after the famed and infamous incident in 1970, the park is actually a somewhat new park with an even newer name. More than half of the final tally — 439 out of 856 responses — voted for “Exploding Whale Memorial Park,” Ms. Messmer said. Exploding Whale Memorial Park is nestled on the banks of the Siuslaw River, and has a nice walking path and put-in access for canoes and kayaks. 4. What do you do with the carcass of a 45-foot, 8-ton whale on the beach? City of Florence workers install the sign for Exploding Whale Memorial Park … City of Florence/Facebook The infamous sperm whale was already dead when it … © “If you talk to people, it’s not necessarily a proud moment,” said Megan Messmer, Florence’s city project manager. "Pieces of meat passed high over our heads, while others were falling at our feet.". Local news stations filmed the spectacular explosion, which had the unfortunate aftermath of showering everything — and everyone — in the immediate vicinity with bits of dead whale. Named after the famed and infamous incident in 1970, the park is actually a somewhat new park with an even newer name. The peculiar name commemorates a historic event. The residents of the town have voted for the park to be renamed after the incident in order to honour the whale that was washed ashore in 1970.